What's New

ASTHO President's Challenge Initiatives

A yearly initiative of ASTHO to improve population health through the work of state public health agencies.

My.ASTHO

Join your colleagues and participate in various discussion topics on my.ASTHO, ASTHO's collaboration and discussion platform. ASTHO members can access the platform here »

Find your state health agency and health official

StatePublicHealth.org

  • Leading Health Equity in a Time of Upheaval

    As a lifelong public health professional, I am troubled by the opportunities I missed to better address racial injustice. How could I have better described the impact that racism has on health? What programs did we develop that could have been more focused on health equity? Were the policies we created more harmful than helpful from an equity standpoint?.

  • I Can't Breathe

    Having millions of people in our country feeling that they don’t belong is an existential threat to our society. In response, public health efforts must foster meaningful participation by everyone in the design, creation, and implementation of our political, social, and cultural structures and policies. Community engagement and community organizing must become core public health functions with individuals and institutions being accountable to each other. Sharing of power, having community members at decision-making tables, and effective inclusion of a wide range of voices, opinions, and ideas will be key to success. Our new way of doing public health work must begin immediately and we should all hold our breath until everyone can breathe. The healthy air of belonging, equity, and social justice will be our tribute to the memory of George Floyd, the elder choking on particulates, the asthmatic girl missing school, the immigrant meatpacker, the lynching victims, and all the protesters demanding to be part of an equitable, just, and healthier future.

  • How to Address COVID-19 in Communities of Color

    The statistics of who is dying from COVID-19 paint a glaring picture and highlight the ever-growing health disparities that exist in communities of color. The mortality rate for African Americans is 2.4 times higher than whites and 2.2 times higher for Asians and Latinos. In addition, although African Americans represent 13 percent of the U.S. population, they represent 25 percent of the deaths. This health disparity is also becoming more prevalent among Latinos, particularly in states and localities where a predominant number of "essential workers" are Latino. As it pertains to the Native American population, the effect on those communities is also troubling because local tribes suspended the services—like casinos and other private enterprises—that often fund vital community programs.