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ASTHO President's Challenge Initiatives

A yearly initiative of ASTHO to improve population health through the work of state public health agencies.

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  • Health Equity and Healing Hate: A Conversation with Norman Oliver

    As Black History Month comes to a close, it’s important to take stock of how far we still have to go in achieving health equity and optimal health for all across racial lines. The reality is African Americans still lag behind other races across many health outcomes: maternal mortality, obesity, hypertension, to name a few. To get a better understanding of this, ASTHO staff spoke with Norman Oliver, MD, MA, the state health official for the Virginia Department of Health. Oliver is an expert on health inequities and was the keynote speaker for a recent conference at the University of Virginia called "Healing Hate: A Public Health Perspective on Civil Rights in America.".

  • States Take Legislative Action to End the HIV Epidemic

    Each year, tens of thousands of Americans are diagnosed with HIV. In February 2019, the federal government announced a goal to end the HIV epidemic by 2030. Meanwhile, states are taking things into their own hands by introducing and implementing evidence-based policies to prevent HIV cases. Policy trends include improving access to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and establishing programs to prevent the spread of infectious diseases, like syringe services programs. In 2020, ASTHO expects states will continue to adopt laws aimed at preventing new HIV cases.

  • Taking Tobacco Cessation to Heart

    February is American Heart Month, and Friday is Valentine’s Day, so it’s a time to reflect on the people we love and care about. It is well-known that heart disease is the leading cause of death in this country, but many are surprised at the toll it takes on young and middle-aged adults. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) now reports that one in three of the life-changing cardiovascular events that took place in 2016 happened to adults aged 35 to 64. Heart disease is a surprisingly common cause of disability and even death in an age group that is frequently overlooked for public health interventions. If we want to lead long lives for our loved ones, our heart health should be a priority.